North Carolina Wildflower of the Year

The North Carolina Botanical Garden and the Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc. are co-sponsors of the North Carolina Wildflower of the Year program. In 2011 we celebrated thirty years of this conservation project, which was initiated in 1982. The aim is to actively promote, each year, throughout the state and region an attractive plant that is native to the southeastern United States.

Scientific/Common Name Family Duration & Habit Flower Color Bloom Time Height Exposure Moisture Germination Code Comments Thumb
Amsonia tabernaemontana
Eastern Bluestar
Apocynaceae
Dogbane Family
Perennial
Herb
Blue, Purple Apr, May 1-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average 3 then 2 This handsome, long-lived southeastern native perennial produces panicles of small, star-shaped blue flowers in late spring. Though only in bloom for a few weeks, Eastern bluestar develops an attractive shrubby appearance. In the wild, it is typically seen growing on rich, wooded slopes and in bottomlands. It is also perfectly happy when planted in average garden soil in full to part sun.
Aquilegia canadensis
Eastern Columbine
Ranunculaceae
Buttercup Family
Perennial
Herb
Red, Pink, Yellow Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul 1-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 2 This southeastern native perennial is easy to grow. The pale red and yellow flowers are borne above the foliage on loosely branched stalks. The pendant flowers are a favorite nectar source of hummingbirds. Eastern columbine is a showy addition to the garden whether planted in small groups or masses. It is an excellent choice for naturalizing as it often seeds in. And it supports up to 12 species of lepidoptera. Eastern columbine also makes an excellent cut flower. 1987 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Asclepias incarnata
Swamp Milkweed
Apocynaceae
Dogbane Family
Perennial
Herb
Pink, Purple Jul, Aug, Sep 3-6 ft. Sun, Part Shade Moist Swamp milkweed’s fragrant dusty-pink flowers attract butterflies in droves. Each intricate flower has five delicately curved petals. Swamp milkweed grows on the banks of streams and ponds, and in flood plains. It tolerates a wide range of growing conditions varying from standing water to soils that never completely dry out. Over time, its shallow rootstocks will eventually colonize an area. Milkweeds are a host plant for Monarch butterflies and supports up to 12 species of lepidoptera.
Asclepias tuberosa
Butterfly Milkweed
Apocynaceae
Dogbane Family
Perennial
Herb
Orange May, Jun, Jul, Aug 1-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 2 Butterfly milkweed is a common roadside wildflower in our area, and like other members of Asclepias genus, is a host to monarch butterfly caterpillars. The distinctive linear leaves and bright orange flowers make butterfly milkweed a standout in summer. Its modest size provides a splash of color without overwhelming small spaces. Drought tolerant and deer resistant, this plants is a “must have” to support Monarch butterflies and up to 12 species of lepidoptera! 1985 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Baptisia albescens
Spiked Wild Indigo
Fabaceae
Legume Family
Perennial
Herb
White Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug 2-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 3 Another excellent native perennial for your sunny garden. This white flowered Baptisia blooms in Spring and is a magnet for bees. Sturdy stems hold spikes of creamy white flowers which will, after their nature, mature into green pea pods. The pods then dry light brown on the stem, rattling as the seeds within dry. This plant is considered poisonous. Easy plant to grow, give it a home that is permanent as members of this genus do not like to be moved once planted. This genus supports up to 15 species of lepidoptera.
Baptisia australis
Tall Blue Wild Indigo
Fabaceae
Legume Family
Perennial
Herb
Blue, Purple Apr, May, Jun, Jul 2-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average 3 This fine southeastern native perennial looks attractive throughout the growing season. Its spikes of blue pea-like flowers are beautiful. Each plant grows into a bushy mound of attractive bluish-green foliage. Tall Blue Wild Indigo is tough and easy to grow. Mature plants have a shrub-like appearance. Once established, it is a drought-tolerant, long-lived perennial. The root of this plant was used by Native Americans to treat skin infections. 1992 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Blephilia ciliata
Downy Woodmint
Lamiaceae
Mint Family
Perennial
Herb
Pink, Blue, Lavender, Purple Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug 1-2.5 ft. (Spread 1-1.5 ft.) Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average 2 Downy wood mint is a clump forming perennial that produces tight clusters of blue-purple, stacked flowers, similar in appearance to those of its mint family relative Monarda. Native to much of the eastern US, this species spreads slowly in the garden by means of rhizomes, but never becomes aggressive. Deer resistant and drought tolerant, downy wood mint complements almost any garden setting as long as it receives greater than 20% of sunlight per day and the soil it is planted in drains well. This species is commonly visited by several species of native bees, and butterflies.
Callicarpa americana
American Beautyberry
Lamiaceae
Mint Family
Perennial
Shrub
White, Pink May, Jun, Jul, Aug 4-8 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 2 (3 months) American beautyberry is a fountain-shaped shrub native to coastal NC. This adaptable species is tolerant of various soils, as long as soil does not dry out. Its gracefully arching stems are showy throughout the fall, due to clusters of bright purple berries. It works well as an understory shrub. To keep American beautyberry more compact you can prune its stems back close to ground level in March but wait until its third year so it is established.
Ceanothus americanus
New Jersey Tea
Rhamnaceae
Buckthorn Family
Perennial
Subshrub, Shrub
White Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul 3-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 2,3 New Jersey-tea is a low-growing deciduous shrub that produces numerous 1-2 inch long panicles of tiny white flowers in late spring. The nectar of its flowers is attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. This species is found growing on roadside banks and along the edges of woods throughout North Carolina. It grows well in hot, sunny to light shade, well-drained sites, and though tricky to establish, it is very drought tolerant once it is established. Its dried leaves have been used for making tea. 2013 N.C. Wildflower of the Year. This genus supports up to 43 lepidoptera species.
Chasmanthium latifolium
River Oats
Poaceae
Grass Family
Perennial
Grass/Grasslike
Green May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 2-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Average, Moist 1 This southeastern native ornamental grass is easy to grow and can be grown in any garden. River-oats is very tolerant of shade and various soil types. Handsome seed heads appear in the fall and are prized for flower arrangements. River-oats seeds in vigorously, creating many seedlings unless its seed heads are removed before the seeds drop. 1994 N.C. Wildflower of the Year. The Chasmanthium genus supports up to 7 lepidoptera species.
Chrysopsis mariana
Maryland Golden-aster
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 1-2 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 2 Maryland golden-aster is a Southeastern native perennial that brightens the fall garden. Golden-yellow daisy flowers with yellow centers are borne on loosely branched stems above a rosette of handsome foliage. This species is typically found growing in sandy or clay soils and in pine forests throughout the southeastern United States. It is easy to grow in poorer soils, as long as there is good drainage. Chrysopsis mariana is our 2018 Wildflower of the Year!
Coreopsis auriculata
Lobed Tickseed
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul 6-8 in. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 1 The cheerful yellow daisy-like flowers of lobed tickseed herald the arrival of spring. Numerous small (1 inch) bright yellow flowers adorn each plant, held above the low-growing foliage. With time, each plant spreads at a moderate rate and forms a handsome clump. Its short stature and showiness make lobed tickseed a versatile native perennial for many gardens. Used by the Cherokee to produce a red dye. 1991 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Eryngium yuccifolium
Northern Rattlesnake-master
Apiaceae
Carrot Family
Perennial
Herb
White, Green, Blue May, Jun, Jul, Aug 2-4 ft. Sun Dry, Average 2 Small bluish-white florets are arranged on round heads at the end of its tall stems. The many small flowers are attractive to butterflies and many other pollinators. The specific epithet yuccifolium means “yucca-leaf” describing its leathery basal leaves. Grown for its attractive foliage as well as its interesting flowers. Try planting this with cardinal flower for a striking combination. 2016 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Eupatorium perfoliatum
Boneset
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
White Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 3-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average, Moist Boneset is an attractive, easily grown southeastern native perennial. Small creamy white flowers are borne in abundance in late summer. It is an excellent plant to include in butterfly gardens. The handsomely textured leaves of this plant are attractive throughout the growing season. Native Americans used boneset, also known as feverwort, medicinally for a variety of ailments. The Eupatorium genus supports up to 40 lepidoptera species.
Eurybia divaricata
White Wood Aster
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
White, Yellow, Brown Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 1-2 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Moist 2 White wood aster is one of the few asters that tolerates shade. Its starry white flowers are welcome in dark spots. Once established, this species typically blooms for many weeks. This southeastern native perennial is stoloniferous and can be counted on to make a dark green groundcover over time. Plants perform best in dappled shade and average soil.
Eutrochium fistulosum
Hollow-stem Joe-pye-weed
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Pink, Purple Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 5-8 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Average, Moist 2 Hollow-stem joe-pye-weed is a large and dramatic perennial that is sure to be a focal point in the garden. As this plant reaches maturity, it will become more and more robust, reaching heights of up to 8 feet and widths of more than 5 feet across. This plant works well in the back of a perennial border or in more naturalized areas. Joe-pye-weeds are some of the best native perennials for butterfly gardening. In late summer, the mauve-pink flower heads will attract many species with their abundant nectar. 2017 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Helianthus angustifolius
Swamp Sunflower
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow, Purple, Brown Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 1-6 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Average, Moist Easy to grow and extremely showy, swamp sunflower produces upright stems of buttery yellow flowers with dark centers, each flower 2 to 3 inches across. Plant it where it has room to reach its full-grown stature. Swamp sunflower makes a fine cut flower. Butterflies flock to it as a source of nectar, and birds enjoy eating its seeds. Swamp sunflower is seen growing in savannahs and wet meadows, primarily in the coastal plain and lower Piedmont. The Helianthus genus supports up to 73 lepidoptera species.
Heuchera americana
American Alumroot
Saxifragaceae
Saxifrage Family
Perennial
Herb
Red, Pink, Green, Purple, Brown Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug 6-10 in. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 1, 4 Beautiful evergreen foliage gives this Southeastern native perennial long-term appeal in the garden. Rosettes of dark green leaves take on a burgundy cast in the winter. Panicles of tiny pinkish-brown bell-shaped flowers rise above its foliage in late spring. In the wild, American alumroot grows in deciduous woods and on rocky outcrops. Plant it at the front of your perennial border. Used medicinally for its astringent properties.
Hibiscus moscheutos
Crimson-eyed Rose-mallow
Malvaceae
Mallow Family
Annual, Perennial
Herb, Subshrub
White, Pink May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 4-6 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average, Moist 3 The blooms of crimson-eyed rose-mallow are among the largest of any of our native perennials. This shrubby perennial has plump, conspicuous flower buds - marvels of architecture and design in their own right which cluster at the tip of each stem and open several at a time. Crimson-eyed rose-mallow normally grows in wet areas such as in marshes and along shorelines, though this perennial also thrives in garden soils with average moisture. 1997 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Kosteletzkya virginica
Seashore-mallow
Malvaceae
Mallow Family
Perennial
Herb, Subshrub
White, Pink Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 5-6 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average, Moist 3 Bright pink flowers adorn this member of the hibiscus family in late summer. Seashore-mallow blooms profusely and has a shrub-like effect in the garden once established. Its flowers are a good source of nectar for butterflies and hummingbirds. Seashore-mallow commonly grows in brackish marshes in coastal North Carolina. Try growing Seashore-mallow with native asters or great blue lobelia. 1990 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Liatris squarrulosa
Southern Blazing-star
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Pink, Purple Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 2 to 6 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average The late-blooming southern blazing-star shares its purple color and spiky habit with other members of its genus. Those familiar with the others will notice, however, that instead of a continuous spike of purple, the larger flower heads of this Liatris are separated by an inch or more of stalk. Southern blazing-star has a range that includes the southeastern United States and extends west to Texas and north to Ohio. It is present though not common in North Carolina. This plant makes its home in open woodlands on dry rocky or sandy soil. It is well adapted to dry conditions and is drought-tolerant once established. 1998 Wildflower of the Year.
Lobelia cardinalis
Cardinal Flower
Campanulaceae
Bellflower Family
Perennial
Herb
Red May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 2-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Average, Moist 1, 4 Green rosettes of foliage produce stalks of brilliant red flowers in late summer. This southeastern native perennial is very attractive to hummingbirds that drink the nectar from the flowers. Cardinal flower is a perennial favorite because of its beauty and versatility. In the wild, it is found in open meadows and alongside streams. It will add beauty and drama to your perennial border or shade garden. Be sure to keep the winter rosettes free of leaves and mulch. 1982-1983, 2001 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Lobelia siphilitica
Great Blue Lobelia
Campanulaceae
Bellflower Family
Perennial
Herb
Blue Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 1.5-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average 1,4 Spikes of lovely blue flowers rise above sturdy plants in late summer. In the wild, great blue lobelia is frequently seen growing in wet meadows and low areas. This adaptable southeastern native perennial will thrive in your perennial border. The blue flowers add a welcome "cool" touch in the summer garden. This perennial is also attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. Used medicinally by Native Americans. 1993 N.C Wildflower of the Year
Marshallia obovata var. obovata
Piedmont Barbara's-buttons
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
White Apr, May, Jun 1-2 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 2 In The Natural Gardens of North Carolina B.W. Wells described Barbaras-buttons as a good choice "for the sunny rock garden". This sun loving, drought tolerant perennial is both lovely and tough but its short stature and fine details make it more suitable for a setting where it will not be overwhelmed by taller plants and where its lacy flowers can be admired up close. This composite is made up of all disc flowers (there are no rays). Their tiny white petals give each button-shaped flower head its lacy appearance
Oenothera fruticosa
Southern Sundrops
Onagraceae
Evening-primrose Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep 1-2 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 1, 4 The lemon-yellow flowers of southern sundrops add a cheerful touch to the garden. They make a nice low-growing filler for the sunny perennial border. The attractive foliage is glossy green, often with purplish spots. In the wild, southern sundrops are found growing in dry woods and meadows and along roadsides. Any well-drained soil is fine for growing this cheerful southeastern native perennial. Very drought-tolerant once established. The Oenothera genus supports up to 16 species of lepidoptera. 1989 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Penstemon laevigatus
Eastern Smooth Beardtongue
Plantaginaceae
Plantain Family
Perennial
Herb
White, Purple, Violet Apr, May, Jun, Jul 1-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 2 Eastern Smooth Beardtongue produces loose clusters of flowers borne on upright unbranched stems. The flowers open white and darken to a pale purplish shade. Excellent cut flower. Its seed pods can provide interest in the fall and its leafy rosettes persist through the winter. In the wild it can be found in low meadows and forest edges. The Cherokee tribe used the species medicinally as a gastrointestinal aid.
Penstemon smallii
Small’s Beardtongue
Plantaginaceae
Plantain Family
Perennial
Herb
Pink, Purple Apr, May, Jun 18-24 in. Sun, Part Shade Average, Well-drained Small's Beardtongue produces numerous late spring flowers held above the attractive foliage. Pink blooms and reddish basal foliage make this the most dramatic of the eastern beardtongues. It can be cut back to encourage a second bloom. Small's Beardtongue makes an excellent cut flower. In the wild, Small's Beardtongue is seen growing on woodland cliffs and banks. Planting it on a slope helps provide good drainage and encourages light self-sowing. 1984 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
Narrow-leaf Mountain-mint
Lamiaceae
Mint Family
Perennial
Herb
White May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep 1-2 1/2 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average, Moist 1 Narrow-leaf mountain-mint is an easy-to-grow southeastern native perennial with delightfully scented foliage. Just brush your hand lightly across the leaves to release the fresh minty fragrance. Narrow-leaf mountain-mint produces copious amounts of nectar, attracting and feeding many beneficial insects. Its upright stems bearing many small white flowers add an unusual cool touch to the summer garden, and make an excellent filler for flower arrangements.
Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii
Black-eyed-Susan
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow Aug, Sep 2-3 ft. Sun Average The Black-eyed-Susan produces dozens of showy yellow flowers. Its large dark green leaves and spreading habit make it very effective when planted in groups. This easily grown SE native perennial provides lots of color in the late-summer garden. This perennial is found growing in meadows and clearings. Many butterflies flock to its cheerful flowers for their nectar. Even after its flowers have faded, the attractive seed heads can be left to provide winter interest and seeds that feed the birds. 1988 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Rudbeckia laciniata
Green-head Coneflower
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb, Subshrub
Yellow Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 3-7 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average, Moist 2 Green-head coneflower is closely related to the black-eyed-susan, and bears dozens of 2-3 inch clear yellow flowers. Its graceful pendulous petals radiate from a gumdrop shaped greenish-yellow central disk. This southeastern native perennial is commonly found growing in wet areas. Green-head coneflower is very adaptable and will also thrive under the conditions in the average garden. 1995 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Sabatia angularis
Common Marsh-pink
Gentianaceae
Gentian Family
Annual
Herb
Pink Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 8-32 in. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Moist
Scutellaria incana var. punctata
Hoary Skullcap
Lamiaceae
Mint Family
Perennial
Herb
Blue, Purple Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep 1-3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Average 2 Hoary skullcap has dense spikes of showy, deep blue flowers that bloom for many weeks in late summer. Its handsomely textured foliage contrasts beautifully with its unusual flowers. Its odd common name comes from the resemblance of the calyx of each flower to a skullcap. This Southeastern native perennial typically grows in the mountains of North Carolina in open woods and clearings and along roadsides. It is attractive enough to make the transition to a more formal garden. 2014 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.  
Silene virginica
Fire Pink
Caryophyllaceae
Pink Family
Perennial
Herb
Red Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug 12-18 in. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Well-drained 2 Fire pink has showy red flowers that add vibrant color to the garden. This southeastern native perennial has low-growing rosettes of narrow, lance-shaped leaves. Established plants produce slender upright stems, each bearing a number of its starry crimson flowers. In the wild, it is seen on wooded slopes and along roadsides. Fire pink blooms prolifically in the garden when provided with good drainage and at least half a day of sun. It provides vivid accent to a border or it can be decorative in a container on a patio or deck. 2015 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Symphyotrichum concolor
Eastern Silvery Aster
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Blue, Lavender, Purple Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov 1 1/2-4 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average 2 This southeastern native aster provides a delightful profusion of lavender-blue flowers in the fall garden. Each plant produces multiple stems, each with dozens of flowers, so the overall effect is very showy. For a colorful garden well past Labor Day, this is a great perennial to include in your garden. This aster blooms profusely when given at least a half-day of sun. Full sun is ideal. Eastern silvery aster is an excellent native plant for butterflies. 1996 N.C. Wildflower of the Year.
Symphyotrichum oblongifolium
Eastern Aromatic Aster
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Purple, Violet Sep, Oct, Nov 3 ft. Sun, Part Shade Dry, Average One of our finest native asters, aromatic American-aster has a densely mounded form. In October, each plant is profusely covered with light purple flowers that have bright yellow centers. One loveable characteristic of this plant is its ability to tolerate less than ideal planting conditions including lean soils and dry sites. Its late bloom time also helps to extend the garden’s beauty and provide resources for fall pollinators.
Tiarella cordifolia var. collina
Foamflower
Saxifragaceae
Saxifrage Family
Perennial
Herb
White Apr, May 6-12 in.; spread-1 ft. Part Shade, Shade Moist Each spring the airy, white, spear-like flowers of Tiarella cordifolia var. collina brighten the shady garden. Handsome green and purple leaves turn burgundy red in the fall. In the wild, foamflower is seen in rich wooded areas of the mountains and Piedmont, thriving in moist well-drained soil, high in organic matter. Low growing, foamflower makes a fine groundcover for shaded areas. It can also be grown in combination with other woodland plants, in the rock garden, or in containers. Foamflower does not tolerate flooding.
Vernonia noveboracensis
New York Ironweed
Asteraceae
Aster Family
Perennial
Herb
Purple Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct 3-7 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Average, Moist 2 New York ironweed is a robust and striking native perennial. Its vibrant purple blooms are beautiful both for their own attributes and for the butterflies they attract. The open architecture of this plant is topped by many small inflorescences, each of which made up of heads packed with purple flowers. In the wild, this plant can be found in moist to wet meadows, where it may bloom with cardinal flower. Plant with other tall butterfly-attracting perennials such as joe-pye-weed and summer phlox. 2004 N.C. Wildflower of the Year
Zephyranthes atamasca
Atamasco Lily
Amaryllidaceae
Amaryllis Family
Perennial
Herb
White, Pink Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun 6-8 in. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Moist 1 The Atamasco-lily produces a showy white lily-like flower, three to four inches across, in the springtime. It is seen growing in rich wet woodlands and meadows. Its underground bulb also produces several flat, elongated leaves. The genus Zephyranthes is named after Zephyrus, who according to Greek mythology was the west wind and husband to Chloris, the goddess of flowers.
Zizia aurea
Common Golden Alexanders
Apiaceae
Carrot Family
Perennial
Herb
Yellow Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug 1-2.5 ft. Sun, Part Shade, Shade Dry, Average, Moist 2 Common golden alexanders produces showy, flat-topped clusters of small, bright yellow flowers in early summer. This plant provides butterflies with both a nectar source and larval food (host plant for Black Swallowtails). It is also attractive to a variety of pollinators. Long-lived, this species is found in rich moist woods, riverbanks, and open meadows. 2012 NC Wildflower of the Year.